Hemingway's Biographer Prefaces

 

#1. An original 2 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown [an English professor at Syracuse from 1925 to his death in 1960] for “A Farewell to Arms”, edited and revised (54 words, signed 6 times with initials E.H.) in Hemingway's hand. After crossing out Brown's comment that the title Farewell to Arms “is a noble pun, a farewell to the arms of war, but a farewell too to Catherine's,” Hemingway has written:  “Untrue.  I had no such intention ever in the title.  This truly must be removed.”

 

#2. An original 3 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown for “For Whom the Bell Tolls”, edited and revised (29 words, signed twice with initials E.H.) in Hemingway's hand. Brown refers to “the execution of the fascists of Avila,” Hemingway asks “Who ever said it was Avila?...There is no cliff beyond the plaza in Avila.”

 

#3. An original 3 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown for “The Old Man and The Sea”, edited and revised (18 words, signed once E.H.) in Hemingway's hand. Brown comments on the sequence of publishing the story.  Hemingway comments "It also comes from many other things un-published in Esquire"

 

#4. An original 2 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown for “To Have and Have Not”, edited and revised (57 words, signed 4 times with initials E.H.)in Hemingway's hand. Brown comments that “its title seems to suggest its economic significance,” but Hemingway writes “Dear Wallace [probably Scribner's editor Wallace Fowlie]: In this title I thought the title meant:  To have happiness, or the possibility of it and yet not be able to attain it.  This was never an economical title.”

 

#5. An original 2 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown for “Death in the Afternoon”, edited and revised (37 words, signed 4 times with initials E.H.) in Hemingway's hand. As a stylistic editor, Hemingway makes no attempt to spare Brown's feelings, his caustic remarks include: “How can a man write this?  State it clearly or not at all.” and "That phrase sounds like kindergarten"

 

 #6. An original 2 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown for “The Green Hills of Africa”, edited and revised (61 words, signed 4 times with initials E.H.) in Hemingway's hand. 

 

 #7. An original 3 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown for “Across the River and into the Trees”, edited and revised (64 words, signed 4 times with initials E.H.) in Hemingway's hand. Some of Hemingway's comments include "This is a very bad sentence" and "This is not a good sentence"

 

#8. An original 16 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown for “Clear and as a Whole”, edited and revised (33 words) in Hemingway's hand. 

 

#9. An original 3 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown for “The Sun Also Rises”, unrevised by Hemingway.

 

#10. An original 4 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown for “In our time”, One word revised by Hemingway.

 

#11. An original 3 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown for “The Torrents of Spring”, Unrevised by Hemingway.

 

 

#12. An original 3 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown for “The Later Stories”, One word revised by Hemingway.

 

#13. An original 17 pp typed draft of the preface by Leonard Brown for “Introduction”, 15 words revised by Hemingway.  One emendation reveals Hemingway's confidence in the importance of his own contribution to humanity.  Brown concludes his introduction:  “To be reminded by Hemingway, amidst the confusions of our time, that the earth abides forever, and that we can live in it and work in it as man has always done, is a service for which we should be grateful.”  Hemingway has crossed out the last phrase and substituted:  “something we should thank him for”. This introduction is evidently the preface to the collection for which the above prefaces were written.